Was I Not Good Enough? … What Did I Do Wrong?

In the last few months at the animal rescue organisation we volunteer at Aniwell, there have been a number of dogs returned. The first one being Charlie, but more recently there have been 2 others who are now in back foster care. With this in mind I thought I’d share this with you..

Charlie – Nov 2011

 

My family brought me home one day,

All cradled in their arms.

They cuddled me and smiled at me

And praised me for my puppy charms.

 

They played with me and pampered me

And showered me with toys.

With all that fun and laughter

There was so much to enjoy.

 

The children used to feed me,

They gave me special treats

I even got to sleep with them,

All cuddled in their sheets.

 

I used to get their laughs and praise

When playing with that old shoe

But did not know the difference

Between that and a pair of Jimmy Choo’s.

 

The kids and I would grab old socks

And for hours we would tug,

Didn’t I do the right thing

When I chewed the Persian rug?

Charlie – January 2012 (back with us in foster care)

 

They said that I was boisterous

And I had grown far too big

Suddenly I was banished outside

And the boredom made me dig

 

The walks grew less and less

They said they hadn’t the time

I wish I could have changed things

But didn’t know my crime.

 

They returned me to the shelter

My spirit broken and my eyes asking why

They mumbled a bunch of excuses

And then suddenly kissed me goodbye.

 

~ by PetPickings.com ~

Dedicated to all the animals who find themselves being returned to shelters around the country and around the world. Charlie has found his “fur-ever” home with us at PetPickings.com, however Digit his brother and friend Muppet (pictured above) are still looking for their second chance. Email adoptions@aniwell.org.za for more information if you think you can offer Digit and / or Muppet a happily-ever-after ending to their story.

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The Magic Of Fostering A Pet

Curly & Moe

Early Friday evening I bid fond farewell and loving goodbye to our 3 porky little foster kittens, who now at 9 weeks of age were eligible to ‘fly the nest’ to their new adoptive homes. I had collected this particular brood from a ‘house of horrors’ late on a Saturday night just over 6 weeks ago following an emergency phone call from a rescue organisation I foster for. At the time they were cold, stressed, exhausted, filthy, starved and possibly sick. Many people may ask why … why foster?

Fostering a needy pet is a richly rewarding experience. I won’t deny that it can be an emotional and often difficult experience that isn’t for everyone, but for those that can and do … it’s an experience that lives on in your heart time after time. In our case, we take in orphaned, underage kittens as we have a household full of pets who enjoy their quiet, over indulged lifestyle and aren’t terribly keen on having a whirlwind young dog pounce its way into their lives. Some of the orphaned kittens are so young and malnourished that they initially need bottle feeding every 2 to 3 hours. What warm hearted person wouldn’t want a continuous stream of the cutest babies to care for and nurture whilst they grow into adorable and adoptable little munchkins?

Larry

There are thousands of ‘invisible’ pets at shelters around the country. The majority of these shelters are filled to capacity as a result of backyard breeders and irresponsible / uncaring pet owners. Often surrendered or rescued pets that require any attention beyond the basics are euthanised, most often due to time constraints and capacity challenges. Rescued pets that are sick, too young, stressed out or unsocialized aren’t the best candidates for adoption. Pets rescued with behavioural issues resulting from abuse and neglect, are injured, temporary ill or simply orphaned face a bleak outcome without the availability of foster homes that can provide the attention and care required to rehabilitate, treat or wean them, thus transforming them into beautiful adoptable pets in the process.

Fostering makes an immeasurable difference for the pets you provide love, rehabilitation and a temporary home to and also for other lost souls at the shelters that may not have had that space available to take take them in. My fosters come in as sad, confused, malnourished, frightened little waifs and leave with their proud adoptive parents as happy, well adjusted, healthy, chubby kittens. Almost without exception I get feedback and photos from the adoptive families to let me know how their new family members have settled in and are doing in general.

If that isn’t a big enough reward, I don’t know what is.

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