The Magic Of Fostering A Pet

Curly & Moe

Early Friday evening I bid fond farewell and loving goodbye to our 3 porky little foster kittens, who now at 9 weeks of age were eligible to ‘fly the nest’ to their new adoptive homes. I had collected this particular brood from a ‘house of horrors’ late on a Saturday night just over 6 weeks ago following an emergency phone call from a rescue organisation I foster for. At the time they were cold, stressed, exhausted, filthy, starved and possibly sick. Many people may ask why … why foster?

Fostering a needy pet is a richly rewarding experience. I won’t deny that it can be an emotional and often difficult experience that isn’t for everyone, but for those that can and do … it’s an experience that lives on in your heart time after time. In our case, we take in orphaned, underage kittensĀ as we have a household full of pets who enjoy their quiet, over indulged lifestyle and aren’t terribly keen on having a whirlwind young dog pounce its way into their lives. Some of the orphaned kittens are so young and malnourished that they initially need bottle feeding every 2 to 3 hours. What warm hearted person wouldn’t want a continuous stream of the cutest babies to care for and nurture whilst they grow into adorable and adoptable little munchkins?

Larry

There are thousands of ‘invisible’ pets at shelters around the country. The majority of these shelters are filled to capacity as a result of backyard breeders and irresponsible / uncaring pet owners. Often surrendered or rescued pets that require any attention beyond the basics are euthanised, most often due to time constraints and capacity challenges. Rescued pets that are sick, too young, stressed out or unsocialized aren’t the best candidates for adoption. Pets rescued with behavioural issues resulting from abuse and neglect, are injured, temporary ill or simply orphaned face a bleak outcome without the availability of foster homes that can provide the attention and care required to rehabilitate, treat or wean them, thus transforming them into beautiful adoptable pets in the process.

Fostering makes an immeasurable difference for the pets you provide love, rehabilitation and a temporary home to and also for other lost souls at the shelters that may not have had that space available to take take them in. My fosters come in as sad, confused, malnourished, frightened little waifs and leave with their proud adoptive parents as happy, well adjusted, healthy, chubby kittens. Almost without exception I get feedback and photos from the adoptive families to let me know how their new family members have settled in and are doing in general.

If that isn’t a big enough reward, I don’t know what is.

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3 thoughts on “The Magic Of Fostering A Pet

  1. Just make sure your foster pets don’t become part of the family. Our family has grown from 6 (excluding Koi) to 11 because we ended up adopting some of them :)

    • LOL!! Ok, so we added 3 rescue kittens and 2 SPCA tortoises to the family, but have now officially reached ‘full capacity’ – but then those were conscious decisions we made. Don’t let our family statistics put you off though! We’ve had just as many, if not more pass through our doors and be adopted out :-)

  2. Pingback: The PetPickings.com "No Kill Revolution" Starts With YOU! | PetPickings.com Blog

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